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🇨🇭 The importance of lymphatic drainage for good health

The proper functioning of the lymphatic system is essential for our body's ability to drain stagnant liquids, detoxify, regenerate tissues, filter toxins and foreign substances, and maintain a healthy immune system (Asdonk, 1970, Adair and Guyton, 1982) . It is a complex system consisting mainly of lymphatic vessels and joints that work in collaboration to perform these operations.

 

Unlike the circulatory system, which uses heart pumping to circulate blood flow, lymphatic vessels rely on hundreds of tiny muscle units throughout the body to push lymphatic flow (Mislin, 1961). These contractions allow the lymphatic vessels to carry the transport of numerous substances (for example, proteins, toxins, hormones, fatty acids, immune cells etc.) to the lymph nodes, which can then be reworked. The action of these muscle units can be hindered or interrupted, due to surgery, trauma, burns, infections, fatigue, stress or age. When lymphatic circulation stagnates, fluids, proteins, cells and toxins accumulate, and cellular functioning is significantly compressed (Adair, Guyton, 1982). This could pave the way for many physical ailments and speed up the aging process.

 

Lymphatic drainage is a manipulative technique designed to achieve and support the correct functioning of the body. Its origins can be traced back to two traditions in particular: the published research of Frederic Millard, a Canadian osteopathic doctor (1922), and Emil Vodder, a Danish massage practitioner and doctor of philosophy (1932). Over the years, the methods based on the discoveries of these two pioneers have been refined, refined and expanded. Today lymphatic drainage techniques are used as standard scientific practice across Europe and continue to gain recognition from both healthcare professionals and patients.

 

How the lymphatic drainage technique is performed

 

The process involves the use of delicate manual maneuvers aimed at helping the circulation of body fluids. While the exact amount of pressure applied depends on the specific area and pathology, it is on average an extremely light technique (5 g of pressure).

 

Using this technique, trained therapists are able to detect the specific rhythm, direction, depth and quality of the lymph flowing to any part of the body. From there they can use their hands to perform the mnual map of the lymphatic vessels to evaluate the general direction of the lymphatic circulation, the stagnation areas, and the best alternative routes for lymphatic drainage and other body fluids (Chikly, 2001).

 

 

The benefits of lymphatic drainage therapy

 

Because of nature and role of the lymphatic system, lymphatic drainage can be useful in correcting numerous conditions and in preventive health maintenance. This is why you will find a wide range of professionals who use this technique. Among them are doctors, osteopaths, chiropractic doctors, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, naturopaths, nurses, lymphedema specialists, dentists, masseurs, and bodyworkers.

 

In essence, lymphatic drainage works to help the circulation of body fluids, to stimulate the functioning of the immune system, and promote a state of relaxation and balance within the autonomic nervous system. It is proven that when these actions are performed, the results can be:

 

Reduction of edema (swelling) and lymphedema of many origins

Detoxification of the body

Tissue regeneration (for example, from pre and post-operative burns and scars) and anti-aging effects

Relief of inflammatory states and conditions such as acne, eczema, psoriasis and chronic allergies etc.

Immune system stimulation for preventive and therapeutic effects

Reduction of symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia

Chronic pain relief

Deep relaxation for insomnia, depression, stress, loss of vitality, and loss of memory

Antispasmodic actions to relieve diseases such as voluntary or involuntary muscle hypertonicity

Attenuation of fat cells and tissue cellulite

 Reduction of edema (swelling) and lymphedema of many origins

* Detoxification of the body

* Regeneration of tissues (for example, from burns and scars pre and

* post-operative) and anti-aging effects

* Relief of inflammatory states and conditions such as acne, eczema, * psoriasis and chronic allergies etc.

* Stimulation of the immune system for preventive and therapeutic effects

* Reduction of symptoms of chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia

* Relief of chronic pain

* Deep relaxation for insomnia, depression, stress, loss of vitality, and loss of memory

* Antispasmodic actions to relieve diseases such as voluntary or involuntary muscle hypertonicity

* Attenuation of fat cells and tissue cellulite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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